Desirable, early Wilhelm Furtwaengler Autograph

Desirable, early Wilhelm Furtwaengler Autograph: Hand-signed Photo. CoA

The Autograph comes with a Certificate of Authenticity.

3,4 x 5,5 inches.  Very fine condition. No postcard, real photograph. Photo by Hans Dietrich & Co, Wien.

Wilhelm Furtwaengler (1886 -1954) was a German conductor and composer.

At his first concert, he led the Kaim Orchestra (now the Munich Philharmonic Orchestra) in Anton Bruckner’s Ninth Symphony. He subsequently held posts at Munich, Luebeck, Mannheim, Frankfurt, and Vienna, before securing a job at the Berlin Staatskapelle in 1920, and in 1922 at the Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra where he succeeded Arthur Nikisch. Later he became music director of the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra, the Salzburg Festival and the Bayreuth Festival, which was regarded as the greatest post a conductor could hold in Germany at the time.

Towards the end of the war, under extreme pressure from the Nazi Party, Furtwaengler fled to Switzerland. It was during this troubled period that he composed what is largely considered his most significant work, the Symphony No. 2 in E minor.

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Early Otto Klemperer Autograph. Hand-signed Photo Card. CoA

Early Otto Klemperer Autograph. Hand-signed Photo Card. CoA

Conductor Otto Klemperer: Portrait Photo as Photo-postcard (Photo: Mahrenholz, Berlin). Hand-signed by Otto Klemperer.

The Autograph comes with a Certificate of Authenticity.

Otto Klemperer (1885 – 1973) was a German-born conductor and composer. He is widely regarded as one of the leading conductors of the 20th century.

He enhanced his reputation as a champion of new music, playing a number of new works, including Leoš Janacek’s From the House of the Dead, Arnold Schoenberg’s Erwartung, Igor Stravinsky’s Oedipus Rex, and Paul Hindemith’s Cardillac.

In 1933, once the Nazi Party had reached power, Klemperer, who was Jewish, left Germany and moved to the United States. In the U.S. he was appointed Music Director of the Los Angeles Philharmonic Orchestra.

Following the end of World War II, Klemperer returned to Continental Europe to work at the Budapest Opera (1947-1950).

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Siegfried Wagner Autograph. Handwritten Postcard

Siegfried Wagner Autograph. Handwritten Postcard

Siegfried Wagner (1869-1930) German composer, conductor and movie director, son of Richard Wagner. Handwritten Postcard, signed with full name. Written in Bayreuth 10.10.1911, addressed to Hotel Hungaria in Budapest. „Euer Wohlgeboren theile ich mit, dass ich mit Graefin Gravina am 20. Nachmittags eintreffe.“ (Announcement of arrival along with countess Gravina at Hotel Hungaria in the afternoon of 20th)

The Autograph comes with a Certificate of Authenticity.
Graefin Gravina, Blandine von (1863-1941) was the second daughter of Cosima Wagners (marriage with Hans von Buelow). She was married to the Italian Count Biagi(n)o Gravina (1850-1897), who committed suicide.

Display with option to show the front or the reverse oft he postcard. Photo of Siegfried Wagner at the upper part. The matted object has been in a frame and can be framed easily again.

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Lauritz Melchior Autograph on Portrait Photo CoA

Lauritz Melchior Autograph on large b/w Foto, signed at lower margin.

The Autograph comes with a Certificate of Authenticity.

20,5 x 25,4 cm (8 x 10 inches) , bend at the lower right corner otherwise very good condition.

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Lauritz Melchior (20 1890 – 1973) was a Danish and later American opera singer. He was the pre-eminent Wagnerian tenor of the 1920s, 1930s, and 1940s and has since come to be considered the quintessence of his voice type. Late in his career, Melchior appeared in movie musicals and on radio and television. He also made numerous recordings.

Word of his talent spread and was heard of by Cosima and Siegfried Wagner at Bayreuth. There the re-opening of the Festival for 1924 was under preparation. Melchior was engaged to sing Siegmund and Parsifal. This prestigious contract opened the way to several other appearances such as a Wagner concert with Frida Leider in Berlin in 1923. Around this time several acoustic records were cut for Polydor.

On May 14, 1924 Lauritz Melchior made his debut, as Siegmund, at the Royal Opera House at Covent Garden in London. The result was a smashing success. Some weeks later Melchior made his debut on the stage of the Festspielhaus in Bayreuth in the roles of Siegmund and Parsifal. In July 1925 Adolf Hitler attended a performance of Parsifal in Bayreuth as a guest of Winifred Wagner. According to Walpole, who was sitting in Wagner’s box next to Hitler, as Melchior sang, “the tears poured down Hitler’s cheeks”.

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Max von Schillings Autograph: Hand-signed Photo-card 1930.

Max von Schillings Autograph. Hand-signed Photo Card, 1930. CoA

Max von Schillings Portrait Photo-postcard from 1930.
The Autograph comes with a Certificate of Authenticity.

3,5 x 5,5 inches. Fine condition.
Max von Schillings (1868 –1933) was a German conductor, composer and theatre director. He was chief conductor at the Berlin State Opera from 1919 to 1925.
From 1918 to 1925, he succeeded Richard Strauss as intendant of the State Opera in Berlin. In the second half of this decade, he undertook concert tours which took him through Europe and to the USA.

Max von Schillings was an opponent of the Weimar Republic and a declared anti-Semite. The expulsion and exclusion of important Jewish and free-thinking artists from the Prussian Academy of the Arts began during his time as President – some artists affected were Kaethe Kollwitz, Heinrich Mann, Ricarda Huch, Alfred Doeblin, Thomas Mann, Max Liebermann, Alfons Paquet, Franz Werfel and Jakob Wassermann. He laid off Arnold Schoenberg from the teaching staff of the Academy, in contravention of Schoenberg’s contract and in 1933, he ordered Franz Schreker, the leader of masterclasses in composition at the Academy, into early retirement.

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